PRIDE 2020: ‘Sunday Bloody Sunday’ (1971) Uses Sexuality to Portray the Longing for Love

Released in 1971, Sunday Bloody Sunday made waves for depicting the first man-on-man kiss in mainstream British cinema, portraying a bisexual character and for portraying a polyamorous relationship.

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REVIEW: The House That Jack Built (2018) is “Fascinating but Gruesome”

Watching Lars von Trier’s latest film The House That Jack Built is like seeing a true crime podcast come to life.

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REVIEW: Shirley (2020) asks “Who’s Afraid of Shirley Jackson?”

Josephine Decker has established herself as one of the most interesting directors working today. With Shirley, she has created a biopic that breaks free from the lazy retelling of an author’s life, instead allowing the work to be reflective of its subject’s work.

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Flip Screen’s Guide to June 2020

Inspired by James Palmer’s fantastic twitter thread, we’re shaking up the formula and bringing you 9 double bills to inject a bit of fun into your watch parties.

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40 YEARS LATER: Getting Over Myself and Learning to Love Kubrick’s ‘The Shining’ – Part One

I’ll get there, eventually – but for now, with a new perspective, I want to try and understand why I hated it so much. Because, in hindsight, I think the film just got under my skin.

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MHAM: ‘We All Have Powers’: Grief and Trauma in the Spider-Man Films

When the character of Peter Parker and his superhero persona Spider-Man was created by comic book writers and artists Stan Lee and Steve Ditko in the early 1960s, they were excited about the concept of a superhero who wasn’t completely invincible.

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REVIEW: Netflix’s ‘The Midnight Gospel’ Is a Trip Mostly Worth Taking

The Midnight Gospel uses real-life podcast interviews (from the long running ‘Duncan Trussell’s Family Hour’ podcast) as the basis for the in-universe interviews.

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‘Mistress America’ (2015): Lady Bird’s Almost-Sister and The Sense of Self

If we take a step back, it becomes obvious that Tracy is the classic Holden Caulfield type of unreliable narrator armed with the quick-witted social observations of a Baumbach script.

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REVIEW: ‘The Great’ (2020) is Hilariously Outrageous and Charming

The magic and brilliance of The Great is found in its liveliness that demonstrates our endless connection to the past: from its commentary on female liberation to an unabashed playfulness with sexuality, there truly are zero flaws to discuss.

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MHAM: ‘Maniac’ (2019) Presents a Down-to-Earth Depiction of Borderline Personality Disorder in an Otherwise Outlandish World

There is something overwhelmingly lonely about suffering from a condition that is so misunderstood, so feared and so shrouded in stigma that you could go your whole life without seeing it depicted accurately on TV.

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