Now That’s What I Call Kino #8 – The Importance of Josephine Baker

Few figures have a cultural importance as great as Josephine Baker. Born in Missouri 1906, she later started out her career as a background dancer in Broadway. She received her big break in Paris and moved to France during the 1920s. She was the first Black woman to star in a major motion picture when…

Read More

Now That’s What I Call Kino #5 – The Effects of Imperialism in Golden Age Horror

With the popularity of independent horror peaking in recent years, it’s interesting to note what themes that seem to commonly occur in these movies. Filmmakers like Jordan Peele have done a lot to portray the black experience, more specifically what it means to be black in America. But as well as this, he has found…

Read More

Now That’s What I Call Kino #4 – The Absurdity of the Cold War Conflict in One, Two, Three (1961)

At the start of Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond’s screenplay, the title page reads “This piece must be played molto furiouso, suggested speed: 110 miles an hour – on the curves – 140 miles an hour in the straightaways.” Having adapted Ferenc Molnar’s Hungarian one-act play of the same name, One, Two, Three (1961) was…

Read More

Now That’s What I Call Kino #3 – The Visual Imagery of Casablanca

Few films are as perfect as Casablanca. A stunning piece of film history that signifies the epitome of what Golden Age creatives could achieve in Hollywood. The greatest love story ever told tinted in an expressionist noir light – the cinematography of Casablanca is one of many reasons as to why this classic still has…

Read More