REVIEW: ‘House of Hummingbird’ (2018) Soars Beyond Any Expectations

‘A superlative example of the power of film.’ House of Hummingbird is a fascinating film and, to some Western fans of South Korean cinema, an outlier. Park Chan-Wook set an expectation with the likes of Oldboy for particularly violent and surreal works to come from the country, and even Bong Joon-ho’s best picture winner Parasite…

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The Wes Dispatch #4: ‘The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou’ (2004) and the Anti-Hero’s Journey

The fourth edition of The Wes Dispatch takes a look at anti-heroes and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

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How ‘It Follows’ (2014) Re-Imagines the Final Girl

In the nearly thirty years since the term was coined, Final Girls have appeared in many iterations, some pushing boundaries and some in line with the traditional trope. David Robert Mitchell’s film It Follows (2014) directly confronts the problems with the Final Girl while maintaining some elements of the trope, playing a role in crafting a new, modern version of the Final Girl.

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REVIEW: Shudder Original ‘The Beach House’ (2020) is Neither Scary nor Memorable

Although The Beach House has all the ingredients of a smart low-budget terror, it has none of the bite.

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REVIEW: ‘In Her Hands’ (2020) is a Heart-warming, if Heavily Clichéd, Demonstration of the Power of Music

Ludovic Bernard’s in Her Hands is certainly far from perfect, but it succeeds in sweeping you up into an often-satisfying emotional journey, eventually leaving you at peace.

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REVIEW: ‘Babyteeth’ (2019) is a Daring Tale of Young Love that May Literally Send Shivers Down Your Spine

Shannon Murphy, articulate, clever, and one of the recent directors of Killing Eve, makes her feature film debut with one of the smartest films of the year, and establishes herself in record time as one of the prime directors to look out for.

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PRIDE 2020: “It makes me feel free, or some shit” – Coming Out of Hiding as Portrayed in ‘Slap’ (2014) and ‘Miller & Son’ (2019)

Set within masculine environments, Slap and Miller & Son provides necessary criticism of societies’ narrow expectations of gender and how hurtful these expectations are for anyone transgressing them.

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