31 Days of Horror: Week Four Roundup

Four weeks down, one to go! In the penultimate week of the 31 Days of Horror challenge, I decided to focus on films that have been sitting in my watchlist for far too long. Though I found some films to be disappointing, there were some gems hidden in the pile, making for a great week of horror films.

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Women in Horror Presents: The Scream Queen Awards

Every awards season, Scream Queens are snubbed with little-to-no recognition. It isn’t until years later, when their films have reached “legendary” status, that you begin to hear things like, “She was the best,” “There’s no other like her,” and whatnot. Well we here at Flip Screen, do not want to wait until the page has turned to honor these amazing Women in Horror. That is what this column is all about. So, we decided to put together a Scream Queen Awards to give recognition to the many powerful performances that have graced the horror genre.

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31 Days of Horror Challenge: The Kick-off

Every Tuesday, I’ll share mini reviews of each movie from the past week and at the end of the month, I’ll rank them all. Since there are so many movies, I will share one pro, one con, my star rating, and a few sentences of my thoughts. By the end of the month, we’ll have a stockpile of quick reviews to help you pick a scary flick to watch yourself.

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“You Shame Me!”- Analyzing a Woman’s Shame in ‘Drag Me to Hell’ (2009)

Since its initial release, Drag Me to Hell has received critical and commercial success. It showed the same scary, campy horror brilliance that Raimi demonstrated with The Evil Dead decades before. What also makes Raimi’s Drag Me to Hell so amazing is the subtext of shame. Whether he intended to or not, his film is saturated with associations of a woman’s shame. For this month’s Women in Horror, we want to take a deep dive into this subtext and dissect Raimi’s subtle nuances to convince you that this film is truly about a woman’s shame and how it is these insecurities that lay her literal path to hell.

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‘Ticked-Off Trannies with Knives’ (2010): Flipping the Script for Trans Women in Horror

Perfectly imperfect and wonderfully cheesy, Ticked-Off Trannies With Knives actively pushes back on the rarely questioned trope of trans women as murderers in a wildly entertaining way. The campy classic highlights the issues with the treatment of trans women on and off the silver screen while making trans women the vigilante heroes of the story in a fight against transphobic attackers.

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‘Sisters’ (1973) is a Reminder of Today’s Not-So-New Discussion

Liberation. Movement. Abolition. Accountability. These are just a few words circulating the atmosphere today. These words bring out a feeling, a feeling that breeds reflection and conversation in so many, including myself. They’ve been circulating the inner workings of my mind. Constantly. They were prevalent in my mind when I sat down to watch the 1973 film Sisters on HBOMAX, and I found those words plastered over every scene, warping every line spoken, and leaving me with that feeling for some reflective conversation.

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How ‘It Follows’ (2014) Re-Imagines the Final Girl

In the nearly thirty years since the term was coined, Final Girls have appeared in many iterations, some pushing boundaries and some in line with the traditional trope. David Robert Mitchell’s film It Follows (2014) directly confronts the problems with the Final Girl while maintaining some elements of the trope, playing a role in crafting a new, modern version of the Final Girl.

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The Best Queer Women in Horror Films

LGBTQ+ characters don’t often fare well in horror films. Typically, they are horrific monsters or killers, such as in the films Psycho (1960), Dressed to Kill (1980), and Silence of the Lambs (1991). Sometimes, though, lesbian, bisexual and/or queer women get to take the lead in horror, subverting negative stereotypes. The films below are a great start in watching horror films with queer characters that differ from the norm, paving the way for continued representation of queer women in horror.

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Ten Black and Totally Badass Villains and Heroines in Horror

Black women continue to play a wider (though not much wider) range of roles, from villains to heroines, in outstanding, unforgettable films. This list is just a small taste of the talent Black women have brought to the genre. It’s their headway that will hopefully bring in another new age where Hollywood can break the stereotypes of them in film completely, and this list can grow even larger as more Black women are offered the titular and main roles in the horror genre.

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REVIEW: The House That Jack Built (2018) is “Fascinating but Gruesome”

Watching Lars von Trier’s latest film The House That Jack Built is like seeing a true crime podcast come to life.

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