Now That’s What I Call Kino #17 – The Definitive Black and White of ‘The Big Heat’ (1953)

Post World War II Hollywood was famed for its darker tales that emphasised the cynical attitudes of Americans who had seen the rise of fascism and millions of lives lost. The 40s and 50s looked towards European filmmakers and inspired their own visual style from their roots. As well as this, the crime drama that…

Read More

The Ten Best TV Episodes of 2020

Last year, myself and guest writer Daniel Nicholl compiled a list of the best TV episodes of 2019. So given the fact that 2020 has been another excellent year for TV (and TV alone) – it seemed wise for us to carry on this trend. So, in no particular order, here is a list of…

Read More

Now That’s What I Call Kino #16 – Classic Christmas Films

It’s nearly the end of this year and like everyone else, I’m exhausted. I pondered for days wondering what to dedicate my final written piece of this year and for ‘Now That’s What I Call Kino’, before eventually deciding to do a good old fashioned list. So to finish this year, here are five essential…

Read More

REVIEW: ‘Mank’ (2020) is a Light-Attempt at Recreating Golden Age Hollywood

Mank is an interesting concept on paper, but in reality a dull affair with many more interesting stories underneath it. At the start of the year, there were countless films that people had anticipated for 2020. But after multiple postponements now being pushed to 2021, there was little left for cinephiles to sink their teeth…

Read More

Now That’s What I Call Kino #15 – The Original Christmasploitation Genre

Christmas movies are an easy cash grab, let’s not lie to ourselves. You can make a quick buck at the box office or become a cult classic that is shown every December until the end of time. It’s an easy way to create a franchise too (ala Nativity series) and Christmas films themselves are relatively…

Read More

Now That’s What I Call Kino #14 – Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer (1964)

After taking a much-needed time off in November, it’s time to resume the usual dabbing of classic gems that has graced the big or small screen from years past. We’ve left spooky season behind and have quite literally stepped into Christmas as the holiday season now begins. Whilst there are the obvious choices of Christmas…

Read More

Now That’s What I Call Kino #13 – The Significance of ‘Night of the Living Dead’

Few films have impacted the horror genre like Night of the Living Dead (1968). As George A Romero’s debut, this b-movie would end up becoming a cult classic that would inspire and create a whole new genre of film. It’s no secret that Romero gained his nickname ‘the King of the Zombies’ for Living Dead…

Read More

REVIEW: ‘American Utopia’ Shows David Byrne Is As Good As He Ever Was

David Byrne has the most calming presence I’ve ever witnessed. 36 years after the ground-breaking Stop Making Sense, David Byrne is still taking our expectations of concerts and theatre, elevating them to a higher level that only a frontman like him could do. Stop Making Sense was more than just a concert, it was performing…

Read More

Now That’s What I Call Kino #12 – Silent Era Classic: The Phantom Carriage

This week’s column piece may be a short one as London Film Festival has kept me busy, but I’m still carrying on with the spooky theme for October by highlighting a classic horror film from the silent era that you should check out: The Phantom Carriage (1921). One of the most important and earliest works…

Read More

LFF REVIEW: ‘Never Gonna Snow Again’ Is As Ambiguous As It Comes

Little reveals itself at times which can make the film feel as if it’s paused in motion rather than moving forward. The mysterious stranger – a plot point as old as time but one that hasn’t ever lost its touch. The concept of mystery is kind of endless, meaning that the setting, character and idea…

Read More