Now That’s What I Call Kino #9 – The Expressionism of Humphrey Bogart

Few faces are as recognisable in the Hollywood era than Humphrey Bogart’s. Labelled by most rankings as one of the greatest (if not the greatest) actors of all time, Bogart found the peak of his career in the 1940s when the gangster flicks of Hollywood were re-emerging as film-noir. Bogart didn’t break into Hollywood when…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #8 – The Importance of Josephine Baker

Few figures have a cultural importance as great as Josephine Baker. Born in Missouri 1906, she later started out her career as a background dancer in Broadway. She received her big break in Paris and moved to France during the 1920s. She was the first Black woman to star in a major motion picture when…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #7 – The Legacy of Lou Gehrig in The Pride of the Yankees (1942)

With sports reassuringly making their way back to dominating our TV channels, it seemed right for this week’s article to look back at the world of sports biopics in Golden Age Hollywood. And whilst the sports of boxing, football and so forth have their own stories to tell – the one highlighted this week is…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #6 – The Classic Shorts of Looney Tunes

Few sounds are as recognisable as the Looney Tunes theme tune – which is  implanted into any kid who watched Saturday morning cartoons. With an array of quirky characters and limitless skits, the toon squad have become icons in the world of animation. Whilst they may often fall into the shadows thanks to their noisy…

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REVIEW: Tenet (2020) Strives to Break New Ground

Tenet is a ferocious film that moves forwards and backwards at an alarming rate

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #5 – The Effects of Imperialism in Golden Age Horror

With the popularity of independent horror peaking in recent years, it’s interesting to note what themes that seem to commonly occur in these movies. Filmmakers like Jordan Peele have done a lot to portray the black experience, more specifically what it means to be black in America. But as well as this, he has found…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #4 – The Absurdity of the Cold War Conflict in One, Two, Three (1961)

At the start of Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond’s screenplay, the title page reads “This piece must be played molto furiouso, suggested speed: 110 miles an hour – on the curves – 140 miles an hour in the straightaways.” Having adapted Ferenc Molnar’s Hungarian one-act play of the same name, One, Two, Three (1961) was…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #3 – The Visual Imagery of Casablanca

Few films are as perfect as Casablanca. A stunning piece of film history that signifies the epitome of what Golden Age creatives could achieve in Hollywood. The greatest love story ever told tinted in an expressionist noir light – the cinematography of Casablanca is one of many reasons as to why this classic still has…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #2 – The Forgotten Pioneer of Alice Guy-Blaché

Cinema was born with the Lumière Brothers, but little do people know that narrative film began somewhere else. In 1896, whilst the Lumière’s were amazed in recognition of trains and people leaving their work, Alice Guy-Blaché looked at the medium of film and the wider landscape it can bless than just documenting real life. Whilst…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #1 – The Illustrious Career of Olivia de Havilland

Welcome to Now That’s What I Call Kino, a column ready to take a deep dive into movie classics. These weekly features will take a look into a certain person or theme of classic movies. Hollywood lost a true icon last week when the late Olivia de Havilland died at the grand age of 104.…

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