The Queer Sexual Tension in Detective Stories

Obsession, devotion, pursuit – all can be acts synonymous to falling in love. However, they are also the key elements for a detective cat-and-mouse story. The relationship between a detective and the criminal they hunt is one that – in many great crime stories – becomes intimately close. They chase each other, play with each…

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‘The George Lucas Talk Show’ (2020) is an Earnestly Silly Celebration of Star Wars

When an essentially unavoidable piece of pop culture such as Star Wars is heavily discussed, parodied and referenced throughout media and in everyday conversation, it can begin to lose the unique appeal that initially drew people in and made them fans. That’s why some people refuse to engage in things that are popular; if you hear about something enough, even if it’s in a positive manner, you feel like you’ve already experienced it and don’t need to delve any deeper.

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TIFF INDUSTRY SELECTS REVIEW: ‘Holler’ (2020) Impresses With Biting Criticism

Precariousness of employment in America is something of a hot topic at the moment. With a President repeatedly promising more jobs despite record unemployment, Nicole Riegel’s debut Holler (2020) looks into the heart of industrial America and creates a coming of age film that captures the essence of Trump’s presidency.

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REVIEW: ‘Never Be Done: The Richard Glen Lett Story’ (2020) is a Portrait of Addiction and Sobriety

Never Be Done: The Richard Glen Lett Story opens with Lett touring the Vancouver comedy club scene, arguing with the audience, making crude jokes, and refusing to pay his bar tab. He’s been kicked out of almost every establishment in the city and it’s easy to judge him because he comes across as such a hateful person. Richard Lett is an old school Canadian comedian, old school being a kinder description for offensive. He’s brash, loud, and rude, with his personality making it easy to dismiss him. But Never Be Done takes the time to uncover why Lett makes these actions.

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #7 – The Legacy of Lou Gehrig in The Pride of the Yankees (1942)

With sports reassuringly making their way back to dominating our TV channels, it seemed right for this week’s article to look back at the world of sports biopics in Golden Age Hollywood. And whilst the sports of boxing, football and so forth have their own stories to tell – the one highlighted this week is…

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FRIGHTFEST REVIEW: ‘Blinders’ (2020) is an Engaging Study of Entitlement

Writer and director Tyler Savage attempts to deconstruct the Los Angeles stereotype by initially leaning into it before ruthlessly tearing it apart.

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Top of the Docs #33 – Extreme Private Eros: Love Song 1974

In his film Extreme Private Eros: Love Song 1974 (1974) Kazuo Hara throws this general rule out of the window, creating an intensely intimate portrait of his ex-wife, radical activist Takeda Miyuki.

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The Inscrutable Mysteries of ‘Picnic at Hanging Rock’ (1975) and ‘Lake Mungo’ (2008)

In storytelling, we’re obsessed with the process of solving mysteries. Detective fiction has been around since the birth of the novel and you can’t turn on your television without seeing reruns of five different whodunnits or procedural shows. Writers can provide us with the smallest crumbs of clues and still completely hook us, leading us on towards the final, ultimate reveal. Because a mystery is not whole without its resolution.

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REVIEW: ‘I’m Thinking of Ending Things’ (2020) is a Paradox of a Film

I’m Thinking of Ending Things is everything and nothing, meaningless but meaningful.

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #6 – The Classic Shorts of Looney Tunes

Few sounds are as recognisable as the Looney Tunes theme tune – which is  implanted into any kid who watched Saturday morning cartoons. With an array of quirky characters and limitless skits, the toon squad have become icons in the world of animation. Whilst they may often fall into the shadows thanks to their noisy…

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