GFF REVIEW: ‘Redemption of a Rogue’ (2021) is an Intriguing Premise but a Lacklustre Film

Writer/director Phillip Doherty makes his feature debut with Redemption of a Rogue, a story about a long-absent son returning to his hometown hoping to make amends.

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GFF REVIEW: ‘Killing Escobar’ (2021) is a Questionable Documentary About an Assassination Attempt in the Amazon

Certainly ‘Killing Escobar’ is a unique story, but it isn’t nearly as strange or as impressive as the film wants you to think it is.

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GFF REVIEW: ‘The Man Standing Next’ (2020) is a Tale of Intrigue and Espionage delivered at a Snail’s Pace.

With a huge cast of characters, each with their own loyalties and motivations, ‘The Man Standing Next’ feels very similar to the intrigue of a royal court.

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GFF Review: ‘Dreams on Fire’(2021) is a Neon-Drenched Exploration of Tokyo Dance Culture

‘Dreams on Fire’ is a film that’s clearly entranced with its subject matter and it’s designed to make its audience feel exactly the same way.

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GFF REVIEW: ‘Eye of the Storm’ (2021) is an Endearing Look at an Artist Late in His Career

Eye of the Storm is an account of the highly celebrated Scottish landscape artist James Morrison in what would, sadly, turn out to be the final months of his life.

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GFF REVIEW: ‘Iorram (Boat Song)’ (2021) is a Gentle Collage of Living History

Iorram is a piece of actual history presented as cinema. Or more accurately, as its subtitle suggests, as a piece of traditional poetry and song.

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GFF REVIEW: ‘The Swordsman’ (2020) is Enjoyable but Nothing New

Despite how snugly The Swordsman fits within this oft-explored genre, it is nonetheless a solidly entertaining piece of work with well-developed characters.

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GFF REVIEW: ‘Creation Stories’ (2021) is a Self-Indulgent Disappointment

Taking an exciting and fascinating part of British musical history the film chooses to explore it and explain it through one specific pair of rose-tinted glasses.

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Black Cats and Monster Masks: The Other Side of Horror in ‘Onibaba’ (1964) and ‘Kuroneko’ (1968)

Onibaba and Kuroneko do not seek to instil fear through a series of frights and scares. Instead, they plunge their hands into the horror of reality and prove that humanity already has plenty of things to be scared of.

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