Now That’s What I Call Kino #13 – The Significance of ‘Night of the Living Dead’

Few films have impacted the horror genre like Night of the Living Dead (1968). As George A Romero’s debut, this b-movie would end up becoming a cult classic that would inspire and create a whole new genre of film. It’s no secret that Romero gained his nickname ‘the King of the Zombies’ for Living Dead…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #12 – Silent Era Classic: The Phantom Carriage

This week’s column piece may be a short one as London Film Festival has kept me busy, but I’m still carrying on with the spooky theme for October by highlighting a classic horror film from the silent era that you should check out: The Phantom Carriage (1921). One of the most important and earliest works…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #11 – Who is the Greatest Universal Monster?

To carry on Spooktober, following on from The Twilight Zone last week, I thought I may as well talk about another horror favourite of mine – which is the Universal Monster Movies. Although I wouldn’t class myself as ‘obsessed,’ my monster pillow, Bela Lugosi pin and various small posters in my room is still more…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #10 – The Duality of Human Nature in The Twilight Zone

Few TV shows hold up as well as Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone. Airing in 1959, this anthology television series has been responsible for numerous reboots, inspirations and references (I’m looking at you The Simpsons). The Twilight Zone is one of the finest science fiction pieces of media around and despite being over 60 years…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #9 – The Expressionism of Humphrey Bogart

Few faces are as recognisable in the Hollywood era than Humphrey Bogart’s. Labelled by most rankings as one of the greatest (if not the greatest) actors of all time, Bogart found the peak of his career in the 1940s when the gangster flicks of Hollywood were re-emerging as film-noir. Bogart didn’t break into Hollywood when…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #8 – The Importance of Josephine Baker

Few figures have a cultural importance as great as Josephine Baker. Born in Missouri 1906, she later started out her career as a background dancer in Broadway. She received her big break in Paris and moved to France during the 1920s. She was the first Black woman to star in a major motion picture when…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #7 – The Legacy of Lou Gehrig in The Pride of the Yankees (1942)

With sports reassuringly making their way back to dominating our TV channels, it seemed right for this week’s article to look back at the world of sports biopics in Golden Age Hollywood. And whilst the sports of boxing, football and so forth have their own stories to tell – the one highlighted this week is…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #6 – The Classic Shorts of Looney Tunes

Few sounds are as recognisable as the Looney Tunes theme tune – which is  implanted into any kid who watched Saturday morning cartoons. With an array of quirky characters and limitless skits, the toon squad have become icons in the world of animation. Whilst they may often fall into the shadows thanks to their noisy…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #5 – The Effects of Imperialism in Golden Age Horror

With the popularity of independent horror peaking in recent years, it’s interesting to note what themes that seem to commonly occur in these movies. Filmmakers like Jordan Peele have done a lot to portray the black experience, more specifically what it means to be black in America. But as well as this, he has found…

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #4 – The Absurdity of the Cold War Conflict in One, Two, Three (1961)

At the start of Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond’s screenplay, the title page reads “This piece must be played molto furiouso, suggested speed: 110 miles an hour – on the curves – 140 miles an hour in the straightaways.” Having adapted Ferenc Molnar’s Hungarian one-act play of the same name, One, Two, Three (1961) was…

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