Roles in Retrospect #5 – Hailee Steinfeld and ‘Begin Again’ (2013)

In this month’s Roles in Retrospect, we take a look at how Hailee Steinfeld charmed audiences as an angsty and musically talented teen for the first time in 2013’s ‘Begin Again’.

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Roles in Retrospect #2 – Florence Pugh and ‘Fighting with My Family’ (2019)

“In the hands of a less capable actress, Saraya could have easily become a one-dimensional stereotype. However, Pugh’s portrayal of the young up-and-coming wrestler makes her feel truly human.”

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[Between the Lines] What Makes the ‘Pride’ (2014) Screenplay a Crowd-Pleasing Hit

LGBTQ+ audiences sometimes want more light-hearted stories — like 2014’s ‘Pride,’ written by Stephen Beresford.

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[The Revolution Will Be Televised] ‘True History of the Kelly Gang’ (2019) and the Mythological Bedrock of Rebellion

True History illuminates the ways shared fiction gives form and mass to rebellion, and how cult mythology acts as the cornerstone to revolt.

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Between the Lines: The Fantastical Imagery in the ‘Paddington 2’ (2017) Screenplay

Writers Paul King and Simon Farnaby use a mix of sound design, animated illustrations and flashbacks to bring the thoughts of characters to life.

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Between the Lines: NFF Writers Talk About Their Short Films

I was fortunate enough to have a virtual chat with not one, but two writers featured in the strand: Mike Marriage with his dystopian drama Ghillie and Azhur Saleem with his dark thriller Muse.

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Between the Lines: How David Robert Mitchell Writes Horror in the ‘It Follows’ (2014) Screenplay

The surprise horror hit of 2014 is a truly terrifying film thanks to its central premise.

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Between the Lines: ScreenplaySubs Creator Talks About the Value of Reading and Watching a Screenplay

I was fortunate enough to have a conversation with Egan Bisma, the person behind ScreenplaySubs, on the conception of the software, how it was made and the benefits of viewing a film in this particular way.

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“You Shame Me!”- Analyzing a Woman’s Shame in ‘Drag Me to Hell’ (2009)

Since its initial release, Drag Me to Hell has received critical and commercial success. It showed the same scary, campy horror brilliance that Raimi demonstrated with The Evil Dead decades before. What also makes Raimi’s Drag Me to Hell so amazing is the subtext of shame. Whether he intended to or not, his film is saturated with associations of a woman’s shame. For this month’s Women in Horror, we want to take a deep dive into this subtext and dissect Raimi’s subtle nuances to convince you that this film is truly about a woman’s shame and how it is these insecurities that lay her literal path to hell.

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #3 – The Visual Imagery of Casablanca

Few films are as perfect as Casablanca. A stunning piece of film history that signifies the epitome of what Golden Age creatives could achieve in Hollywood. The greatest love story ever told tinted in an expressionist noir light – the cinematography of Casablanca is one of many reasons as to why this classic still has…

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