Now That’s What I Call Kino #9 – The Expressionism of Humphrey Bogart

Few faces are as recognisable in the Hollywood era than Humphrey Bogart’s. Labelled by most rankings as one of the greatest (if not the greatest) actors of all time, Bogart found the peak of his career in the 1940s when the gangster flicks of Hollywood were re-emerging as film-noir. Bogart didn’t break into Hollywood when…

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Lesbians and Gender Nonconformity in ‘Lyle’ (2014)

All in all, this appears to be a model representation of non-exploitative sapphic love. However, every rose has its thorns and Lyle’s happens to be the use of common but harmful trope: the evil butch.

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REVIEW: ‘Through the Glass Darkly’ (2020) is an Intriguing Small Town Mystery

Inspired by her own grandmother’s struggle with Alzheimer’s, Fash tells the story of a woman named Charlie (Robyn Lively) whose recent diagnosis with the progressively debilitating disease hasn’t stopped her from searching for her missing daughter, Lily (Kinsley Isla Dillon), a year after her disappearance.

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Top of the Docs #35 – The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On (1987)

The Emperor’s Naked Army Marches On follows Kenzo Okuzaki, a sixty-two-year-old veteran, who took part in Japan’s campaign in New Guinea during World War Two.

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REVIEW: ‘Spiral’ (2020) is an Enjoyable If Reductive Horror Film

Spiral, the latest from director Kurtis David Harder and writers Colin Minihan and John Poliquin becomes one of the most unapologetically queer horror films in recent memory.

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How David Lynch Doesn’t Use Dialogue in ‘Mulholland Drive’ (2001)

In 2001, David Lynch blessed and cursed the world with Mulholland Drive, an intricately crafted, deeply confusing suspense-noir that deals in Hollywood cynicism, dread, guilt, illusion, innocence, beauty and disdain in equal measure.

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Now That’s What I Call Kino #8 – The Importance of Josephine Baker

Few figures have a cultural importance as great as Josephine Baker. Born in Missouri 1906, she later started out her career as a background dancer in Broadway. She received her big break in Paris and moved to France during the 1920s. She was the first Black woman to star in a major motion picture when…

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REVIEW: Summerland (2020) is a “A Queer Comedy with Humor and Heart”

Directing duo Kurtis David Harder and Noah Kentis, known together as Lankyboy, have always dreamed of making a coming of age road trip film. Their dreams came true with the release of their feature debut Summerland (2020), a queer comedy with equal parts humor and heart. With an upbeat soundtrack, desert scenes, and a Coachella-esque music festival, the film has all the ingredients to make a fun movie that’s perfect for this time of year.

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‘Sleeping With Other People’ (2015), ‘When Harry Met Sally…’ (1989), and the Mortifying Ideal of Being Known

Whether it’s love at first sight or something a bit more complicated, it would seem that every relationship must eventually boil down to the inevitable question: are we friends or are we something more?

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TIFF REVIEW: ‘Still Processing’ (2020): A Journey of Grief and Vulnerability

As Sophy Romvari goes through each of her own childhood photographs for the first time on camera, she gives a stunning portrait of joy, grief and trauma of lost memories.

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