‘√964 Pinocchio’ (1991): Vengeful Outcast, Emetic Spirit

“As a narrative revolving around members of a loathed social underclass, ‘√964 Pinocchio’ [grapples] with conceptual otherness through the fundamental human fear that that which belongs in the body will find its way out.”

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Watching ‘Night of the Living Dead’ (1968) in the Wake of a Pandemic

Night of the Living Dead may have been released over fifty years ago, but as its own circular nature observes and predicts, so little has changed from the small-scale revival of the dead America is not able to grieve.

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Always a Bridesmaid and Never a Bride, Until Now: How ‘Bridesmaids’ (2011) Allowed Women to Take the Front Seat in Comedies 

“Aside from being groundbreaking and hilarious, there is a lot to ‘Bridesmaids’ that often goes unappreciated.”

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‘Solaris’ (2002) is a Romantic Sci-Fi Film That Needs Revisiting

“A movie that is refreshingly and sincerely romantic, marking a dramatic contrast not just to the great bulk of science fiction, but with modern mainstream cinema at large.” Science fiction is making waves once again. With the arguably unexpected success of Dune, a weighty space opera that offers complex lore, audiences may be primed for…

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REVIEW: ‘I’m An Electric Lampshade’ (2021) Has A Weak Spark of Life

This tale of accountant-turned-artist is never clearly docudrama or pure fiction, making for a bizarre watch.

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REVIEW : The Unsuspected Hero of ‘The Courier’ (2020)

‘The Courier’ is a tense, well-orchestrated spy movie. As a veil of secrecy and anticipation, heightened by mutual threats from both USSR and United States, bears over humanity at the dawn of the Cold War, Greville Wynne (Benedict Cumberbatch) is recruited by MI6 to spy on the opposing force. Greville had this far worked as…

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INTERVIEW: Therese Shechter on The Institution of Motherhood in ‘My So-Called Selfish Life’ (2021)

In her paradigm-shifting documentary, feminist filmmaker Therese Shechter explores the lives of childfree women, and examines motherhood as an ingrained societal institution.

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​​BHFF REVIEW: ‘The Sadness’ (2021) Is Tear-Jerkingly Depraved

“In ‘The Sadness’ the fear is not—as Hitchcock might have asserted—what is unseen, but what can be endured.”

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BHFF Review: As ‘Lux Æterna’ (2019) Proves, Bonfires Are So Sexy

“‘Lux Æterna’ associates the cinematic regard with the spectacle of a witch burning, gobbling up misogynistic entertainment at the expense of another’s pain.”

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BHFF Review: In ‘Good Madam’ (2021), Fear Lives In the Fingertips

“Taking up the mantle of other bright stars of the creepy-old-lady-upstairs subsection of the genre, ‘Good Madam’ offers an interesting take on horror that passes, first and foremost, through the hands.”

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