REVIEW: Summerland (2020) is a “A Queer Comedy with Humor and Heart”

Directing duo Kurtis David Harder and Noah Kentis, known together as Lankyboy, have always dreamed of making a coming of age road trip film. Their dreams came true with the release of their feature debut Summerland (2020), a queer comedy with equal parts humor and heart. With an upbeat soundtrack, desert scenes, and a Coachella-esque music festival, the film has all the ingredients to make a fun movie that’s perfect for this time of year.

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‘Ticked-Off Trannies with Knives’ (2010): Flipping the Script for Trans Women in Horror

Perfectly imperfect and wonderfully cheesy, Ticked-Off Trannies With Knives actively pushes back on the rarely questioned trope of trans women as murderers in a wildly entertaining way. The campy classic highlights the issues with the treatment of trans women on and off the silver screen while making trans women the vigilante heroes of the story in a fight against transphobic attackers.

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Christmas in July: Flip Screen’s Top Festive Picks

Who says you can’t have Christmas cheer in the middle of the summer? Christmas in July is an unofficial holiday celebrated with Hallmark sales, movie marathons, and Christmas-themed parties. Flip Screen’s staff decided to put together a list of our favorite Christmas movies that hold up even in the off-season.

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REVIEW: ‘Disclosure’ (2020) Only Scratches the Surface

Sam Feder and Laverne Cox’s documentary Disclosure arrived on Netflix at an opportune time. Transgender people’s healthcare is at risk, jobs are now protected, and long overdue media attention is being given to Black trans women, who are disproportionately affected by state and interpersonal violence. With trans people entering more and more mainstream discussions, there is great possibility for education and change. Disclosure aims to educate its audience about transgender representation in the media using the voices of trans people themselves.

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How ‘It Follows’ (2014) Re-Imagines the Final Girl

In the nearly thirty years since the term was coined, Final Girls have appeared in many iterations, some pushing boundaries and some in line with the traditional trope. David Robert Mitchell’s film It Follows (2014) directly confronts the problems with the Final Girl while maintaining some elements of the trope, playing a role in crafting a new, modern version of the Final Girl.

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The Best Queer Women in Horror Films

LGBTQ+ characters don’t often fare well in horror films. Typically, they are horrific monsters or killers, such as in the films Psycho (1960), Dressed to Kill (1980), and Silence of the Lambs (1991). Sometimes, though, lesbian, bisexual and/or queer women get to take the lead in horror, subverting negative stereotypes. The films below are a great start in watching horror films with queer characters that differ from the norm, paving the way for continued representation of queer women in horror.

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REVIEW: The House That Jack Built (2018) is “Fascinating but Gruesome”

Watching Lars von Trier’s latest film The House That Jack Built is like seeing a true crime podcast come to life.

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Top of the Docs #16 – The Ten Best True Crime Docuseries Streaming Now

If you loved Netflix’s Tiger King, then you’re in luck there’s an abundance of true crime documentary series – a.k.a. docuseries – streaming right now. The docuseries format allows a story to be told with a level detail that couldn’t fit into a single documentary. To save you some time searching, here’s a list of the best ones out there.

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From “The Haunting” to “Thelma”: Lesbian Horror Over the Years

Horror and the LGBTQ+ community have a tumultuous relationship. Often, queer-coded characters are presented as villains whose queerness is part of the reason they’re frightening or they’re the first to die, acting as an example for the rest of the characters.

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REVIEW: Swallow (2019) is “Horrifying Precisely Because of How Real it Feels”

Hunter (Haley Bennett) seems to have it all: a rich husband, a baby on the way, and a gorgeous home with space for a massive garden. Yet, she starts to feel confined to her home. Her aptly-named husband, Richie (Austin Stowell), encourages her to stay inside and rest throughout the pregnancy. With no job to attend to, her life is consumed with preparing the house for the baby. Her relationship with Richie is increasingly distant as Hunter feels stifled by her financial dependency and lack of control of her life. She finds release in a very strange place as she impulsively swallows a small glass marble.

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